Data Sharing

Your patient record is held securely and confidentially on the electronic system at your GP practice.

If you require treatment in another NHS healthcare setting such as an Emergency Department or Minor Injury Unit, those treating you would be better able to give you appropriate care if some of the information from the GP practice were available to them.

This information can now be shared electronically via:

1. The Summary Care Record: used nationally across England
2. The Oxfordshire Care Summary: used locally across Oxfordshire

In both cases, the information will be used only by authorised health care professionals directly involved in your care. Your permission will be asked before the information is accessed, unless the clinician is unable to ask you and there is a clinical reason for access.

A parent or guardian can request to opt out children under 16 but ultimately it is the GP’s decision whether to create the records or not, because of their duty of care to the child. If you are the parent or guardian of a child under 16 and feel that they are able to understand, then you should make this information available to them.

Differences between the Oxfordshire Care Summary and the Summary Care Record

  Oxfordshire Care Summary Summary Care Record
Shared
  •  Across Oxfordshire
  • Across health care settings, including urgent care, community care and outpatient departments
  • With GPs, and with clinicians employed by Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust and Oxford University Hospitals Trust
  •  Across England
  • Across health care settings, including urgent care, community care and outpatient departments
  • With GPs, and with clinicians employed by Oxford University Hospitals Trust
Information source
  •  GP record
  • Other medical records held by different NHS organisations in Oxfordshire
  •  GP Record
Content
  •  Your current medications
  • Any allergies you have
  • Any bad reactions you have had to medicines
  • Your medical history and diagnoses
  • Test results and X-ray reports
  • Your vaccination history
  • General health readings such as blood pressure
  • Your appointments, hospital admissions, GP out-of-hours attendances and ambulance calls
  • Care/management plans
  • Correspondence such as referral letters and discharge summaries
  •  Your current medications
  • Any allergies you have
  • Any bad reactions you have had to medicines
  • Additional information (upon request to your GP) which includes:
    • Significant problems (past and present)
    • Significant procedures (past and present)
    • Anticipatory care information
    • End of life care information – as per EOLC dataset ISB 1580
    • Immunisations
    • Further information can be added (upon request to your GP)
More information:

National Data Opt Out

Information about your health and care helps us to improve your individual care, speed up diagnosis, plan your local services and research new treatments.

In May 2018, the strict rules about how this data can and cannot be used were strengthened. The NHS is committed to keeping patient information safe and always being clear

about how it is used. You can choose whether your confidential patient information

is used for research and planning. To find out more visit: nhs.uk/your-nhs-data-matters

You can choose whether your confidential patient information is used for research and planning.

How your data is used

Your health and care information is used to improve your individual care. It is also used to help us research new treatments, decide where to put GP clinics and plan for the number of doctors and nurses in your local hospital. Wherever possible we try to use data that does not identify you, but sometimes it is necessary to use your confidential patient information.

What is confidential patient information?

Confidential patient information identifies you and says something about your health, care or treatment. You would expect this information to be kept private. Information that only identifies you, like your name and address, is not considered confidential patient information and may still be used: for example, to contact you if your GP practice is merging with another.

Who can use your confidential patient information for research and planning?

It is used by the NHS, local authorities, university and hospital researchers, medical colleges and pharmaceutical companies researching new treatments.

Making your data opt-out choice

You can choose to opt out of sharing your confidential patient information for research

and planning. There may still be times when your confidential patient information is

used: for example, during an epidemic where there might be a risk to you or to

other people’s health. You can also still consent to take part in a specific research project.

Will choosing this opt-out affect your care and treatment?

No, your confidential patient information will still be used for your individual care.

Choosing to opt out will not affect your care and treatment. You will still be invited for screening services, such as screenings for bowel cancer.

What should you do next?

You do not need to do anything if you are happy about how your confidential patient

information is used. If you do not want your confidential patient information to be used for research and planning, you can choose to opt out securely online or through a telephone service.

You can change your choice at any time.

To find out more or to make your choice visit nhs.uk/your-nhs-data-matters

or call 0300 303 5678

National Diabetes Audit

The practice is taking part in the National Diabetes Audit (NDA). The NDA checks whether people with diabetes are getting good care.

The NDA collects information about diabetes care from GP practices and hospitals. This information helps the NHS to improve care. The use of NDA information is controlled by law and strict rules of confidentiality.

The NDA is managed by NHS Digital (formerly known as the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC)), working with Diabetes UK and Public Health England. Taking part in the NDA can help improve understanding of the quality of care for people with diabetes. But you can choose not to take part if you have concerns.

Find out more

To opt in/opt out of Data Sharing please complete our online form.